What Does The Worm In Tequila Mean?

Technically speaking, the worm is not a worm. It is the larval stage of a moth that feeds on the agave plant’s leaves (which is used to produce tequila and mezcal). We’ve all heard the myth that a worm placed in a bottle of tequila results in a higher proof tequila being produced.

So, what is the significance of the worm in mezcal? It wasn’t until the 1950s that larvae began appearing in mezcal bottles, when a mezcal manufacturer discovered a moth larva in a batch of his whiskey and decided that having the stowaway in his bottle increased the flavor of the booze. As part of his marketing approach, he began including ″worms″ in all of his bottles.

Does tequila have a worm in it?

That’s true, there are no worms in any of the tequilas. That is also another widespread misunderstanding. Mezcal, the Mexican alcohol with a worm at the bottom, is really, as you’ve undoubtedly figured by now, a type of liquor from Mexico. Because tequila and mezcal are quite similar in flavor, it is understandable if they are confused.

What is the Mexican spirit that has a worm in it?

  1. Mezcal, the Mexican alcohol with a worm at the bottom, is really, as you’ve undoubtedly figured by now, a type of liquor from Mexico.
  2. Because tequila and mezcal are quite similar in flavor, it is understandable if they are confused.
  3. Despite the fact that both tequila and mezcal are manufactured by distilling the agave plant, mezcal can be prepared from a mix of any one of more than 250 different species of the cactus-like succulents.

How do you serve worm salt with tequila?

Find (or make) some sal de guasano, also known as worm salt, to serve as a traditional insect companion to your agave spirit. Worm salt is made by mixing powdered larvae with salt and chile flakes to create a spicy, earthy seasoning. Mezcal users generally serve the salt on orange slices alongside neat pours of mezcal, but you may substitute tequila if you want to be creative.

What is the origin of the worm in the bottle?

Some believe that the worm in the bottle was first used as a marketing technique in the 1940s and 1950s to encourage consumers to drink more mezcal. Tequila was overtaking the American market, and mezcal needed to find a method to distinguish itself.

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